ITEM 112-1601-R0901 ATTACHMENT                                                                 September 27-28, 2001

 

The University of Montana-Western

School of Education, Business, and Technology

Business Department

 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

 

1.  Briefly describe the proposed new program.  Please indicate if it is an expansion of an existing program; a new program; a cooperative effort with another institution, business, or industry; or an on-campus or off-campus program.  Attach any formal agreements established for cooperative efforts.

 

The University of Montana-Western proposes to convert its Bachelor of Arts Option in Business and Communications to a Bachelor of Science degree in Business with three options: Computer Technology; Business Administration; and Tourism.

 

The B.S. degree in Business is geared toward developing professionals who can concurrently learn to integrate their academic training with hands-on projects and case studies in their desired field of emphasis.  The program, therefore, is designed to integrate theory and practice more rapidly, focus the learning curve significantly to suit employer needs, as well as tap individual creativity and translate academic knowledge into real-life business-oriented experience much more completely than is the case in the current B.A. degree.

 

A distinguishing hallmark of the B.S. degree is that students will be actively engaged in the local and state-wide business community in search of projects with national and international scope.  Every course in the proposed program supports this philosophy, from the availability of teaching and administrative staff to the Program’s comfortable and integral focus on providing state-of-the art information technology training.

 

2.  Summarize a needs assessment conducted to justify the proposal. Please include how the assessment plan was developed or executed and the data derived from this effort.

 

The process toward this degree proposal began in 1995 when Western's former and present students, community business people, and Western faculty and administration met with President Dennison concerning the unclear name of Western's B.A. degree option in Communications Technology/Administrative Science.  Neither employers nor graduate schools understood the name, or the organizational structure of the degree.  In 1999, the primary option in the B.A. degree was changed to Business and Communications, with three supported related options: Business Administration;  Communications Technology; and Tourism.

 

During the Spring of 1999, the Department benchmarked the business curricula of twenty different institutions with similar enrollments to Western.  Of the schools reviewed, 55% had already been granted ACB.S.P accreditation, and the other schools were considering the same.

 

During the Fall of 1999, the Department completed a self-study of the business program in preparation for NASC accreditation.  While preparing for NASC accreditation, the Department also looked at the standards and criteria that would be necessary for ACB.S.P accreditation.  Student outcomes that were considered the most important to the mission of the institution and the business program were defined.  As a result, the Department established an outcomes-based model that would indicate the effectiveness of the business program.  In addition, this review process indicated some new directions that the Department should pursue, which included a degree name change.

A B.S. in Business degree was outlined that  includes a business core consisting of 40 credits along with three option areas, Computer Technology (30-33 credits), Business Administration (30 credits) and Tourism (30 credits).  The degree includes a required internship (10-12 credits) and the institution’s 35-38 general education core.  The structure of the proposed B.S. degree differs from the structure in the B.A. degree by increasing the number of credits required in the option areas and by decreasing the number of elective credits.  The degree structure is also geared toward integrating academic training with hands-on projects and case studies in the students' desired fields of study.

 

Enrollment Trends In The B.A. Option In Business And Technology

 

Enrollment in UM-Western's B.A. Option in Business and Communications has shown steady growth since 1995 (Figure 1)

Text Box: Figure 1.  Comparison of Total B.A. Graduates
to Graduates Listing Business and Communications as Primary Option

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The above graph shows that business students generated from 48 to 67 percent of the total student enrollment in the B.A. degree from AY 1993 – AY 2000.

 

Characteristics of Business Students Enrolled in the Current B.A. Program

 

When reviewing characteristics of graduates of the Business and Communications Option, the following data were  found for AY 1998 – AY 2000:

 

Year Graduated

Number

of Graduates

Intercollegiate

Athlete

 

Place Bound

1998

15

4

6

1999

31

19

5

2000

42

23

5

 

The above table shows that anywhere from 67 to 77 percent of the total students graduated from  the Business and Communications Option from AY 1998 – AY 2000 would be unable or reluctant to pursue a business degree at another postsecondary institution.   By offering an improved degree structure and nomenclature, Western could better serve the needs of these placebound students.

 

Market Demand for Graduates

 

The proposed B.S. degree in Business provides students with a general business core, and the student selects one of three options:  Computer Technology, Business Administration, or Tourism.  Students will find a high demand for their skills and abilities in all three option areas.

 

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, computer and data processing services are among the fastest growing industries in today’s economy.  There is a high demand for Information Processing employees from private businesses, government agencies, and new entrepreneurial ventures.  The B.S. degree in Business with an option in Computer Technology provides students with the skills and abilities needed for a variety of jobs including (but not limited to) computer operator ($18,000- $25,000), computer trainer ($20,000 - $40,000), and networking specialist ($25,000 - $40,000).  Former Western students who have graduated with the B.A. degree and have a strong background in computer technology are currently working at agencies such as Mercedes Benz, Microsoft, State of Montana (various departments), and numerous small businesses where they are working as networking specialists, software training officers, and web page developers.  Salaries average between $30 – $40,000, except for the students employed by Microsoft and Mercedes Benz; these salaries are much higher.

 

Travel and tourism is a keystone for the nation’s economy.  The report entitled A Portrait of Travel Industry Employment in the U.S. Economy shows that employment directly related to the travel and tourism industry has grown 33.3% in the last ten years.  In the State of Montana, the travel industry ranks as its second largest employer, and the earnings per hour are equal to the average for all private industries.  The B.S. degree in Business with an option in Tourism provides students with the skills and abilities needed for a variety of jobs including (but not limited to) hotel/motel manager ($20,000 - $50,000), travel agent ($15,000 - $50,000), and recreation workers ($16,000 - $25,000).  Former Western students who have graduated with the B.A. degree and have a strong background in tourism are currently working at agencies such as Town Pump, Inc. , Marriott, Maverick Travel, State of Montana (various agencies), and various ski resorts like Big Mountain.  Salaries range from $16,000 to $55,000. 

 

The B.S. degree in Business with the option in Business Administration will provide students with the entry-level managerial skills and abilities to work for a variety of small to large businesses, or to start their own business venture.  Former Western students who have graduated with the B.A. degree are currently working as sales representatives ($20,000 – $65,000), retail and parts store managers ($30,000 - $65,000), administrative assistants ($24,000 - $35,000), public relations managers ($27,000 - $58,000), foundation directors ($40 - $65,000), small business owners ($40,000 - $150,000), and ranch managers ($30,000 - $40,000).

 

Toward Graduate School Progression

 

Since 1993, four of 133 business graduates with a B.A. degree, Business and Communications Option, from Western have successfully completed a MB.A. degree.  All four graduates encountered difficulties in  explaining their degree name to the prospective graduate schools.  By adopting a more standardized structure and nomenclature for its baccalaureate business program, Western would facilitate the entry of its graduates into graduate programs.

 

The structure and philosophy of the proposed B.S. Degree in Business would better fit with a professional school philosophy than does Western's current B.A. Option.  The objectives of the B.S. in Business program are designed to transmit a “leadership mind set” focused upon:

a)       Creating dialogue and sharing commitments that facilitate organizational change;

b)       Building effective teamwork orientations;

c)       Imparting relevant knowledge that can be applied immediately;

d)       Aligning technological skills with business theory;

e)       Using and adapting new information technology tools;

f)         Promoting and reinforcing business goals of efficiency, growth, and global adaptation;

g)       Orientating students toward the bottom line.

 

3.  Explain how the program relates to the Role and Scope of the institution as established by the Board of Regents.

 

The proposed B.S. degree in Business is in congruence with the overall mission of UM-Western which is to provide “hands-on, active real-world learning” by employing multiple learning methods through internships, field experiences, service learning, and community involvement.

 

Western has long offered business programs to support its B.S. in Secondary Education.  All of the courses in the proposed B.S. in Business are also used by students in Western's secondary education programs or by students in Western's Associate of Applied Science in Tourism and Recreation degree. 

 

4.  Please state what effect, if any, the proposed program will have on the administrative structure of the institution.   Also indicate the potential involvement of other departments, divisions, colleges, or schools.

 

The University of Montana-Western's academic programs will be reorganized beginning with Academic Year 2001.  This restructuring will place all of Western's Business programs within the School of Education, Business and Technology.  Currently Western's Business programs are housed in the Business and Technology Department of the Arts and Sciences Division.  This realignment reflects the common professional goals of Western's Education and Business and Technology programs. 

 

General education requirements for the B.S. degree remain the same as for the B.A. degree.  MATH 232, Statistics, is required in the B.A. degree and will still be required in the B.S. degree.  Therefore, there will be no negative effects with regard to enrollment in these courses.  If the degree enrollment increases as projected, more sections of the above will need to be added. 

 

5.  Describe the extent to which similar programs are offered in Montana, the Pacific Northwest, and states bordering Montana. How similar are these programs to the one herein proposed?

 

Similar programs are currently offered at Western and most other four-year campuses in Montana and the region.  The changing of the program name to a B.S. in Business would be consistent nomenclature with other small colleges that offer a similar degree and are Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACB.S.P) accredited.  This nomenclature is more easily recognizable by prospective students, employers, graduate institutions, and the populace at large.

 

Western's programs feature more internships and other field experiences than is typical of programs at many other campuses.  Since the current B.A. Option in Business and Communications does not list a business major on the student’s transcript, the nomenclature is a disadvantage to our students who are seeking employment or further study in business.

 

6.  Please name any accrediting agency(ies) or learned society(ies) that would be concerned with the particular program herein proposed. How has this program been developed in accordance with the criteria developed by said accrediting body(ies) or learned society(ies)?

 

The B.S. program in Business has been designed to meet standards and criteria that would be necessary for ACB.S.P accreditation.  It has also been reviewed by the School of Business at The University of Montana-Missoula. Faculty qualifications met the standards for NASC accreditation, and would meet the standards for ACB.S.P accreditation as well.

 

7.  Prepare an outline of the proposed curriculum showing course titles and credits. Please include any plans for expansion of the program during its first three years.

 

Course requirements for the B.S. Degree in Business:

 

General Education Requirements                                                                                    35-38

 

Business Core                                                                                                                   40

Course Number

Course Name

Credits

BUS  217

Business & Electronic Communications

3

BUS  241

Financial Accounting

3

BUS  242

Managerial Accounting

3

BUS  281

or

BUS  282

Business Law I

 

Business Law II

 

 

3

BUS  325

Management & Organizational Behavior

3

BUS  347

Marketing Principles & e-Commerce

3

BUS  341 

or

BUS  353

Business Finance

 

Quantitative Management

 

 

3

BUS  364

Business Ethics

3

COMS  135

Microcomputer Applications

3

Econ 252

Microeconomics

3

Econ 358

International Trade & Finance

3

Math  232

Statistics

4

Coms 236 

or

COMS 205 

or

COMS  339

Advanced Microcomputer Applications

 

Business Information Systems

 

Advanced Database Management

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

Option:

Computer Technology                                                                                      30-33

COMS  205

and

COMS  236

and

COMS  339

Business Information Systems

 

Advanced Microcomputer Applications

 

Advanced Database Management

 

 

 

 

  6*

COMS  210

Computer Hardware & Software Management

 

3

COMS  301

Fundamentals of Networking

3

COMS  301

Telecommunications

3

COMS  403

Systems Analysis and Design

3

Select five of the following seven:

COMS  234

Multimedia

3

COMS  111

Programming Fundamentals

3

COMS  215

Introduction to C Programming

3

IT  230

Computer Aided Drafting and Design

3

COMS  270

or

COMS  370

Fundamentals of Yearbook Layout

 

Publication Layout and Yearbook Design

2

 

3

COMS  306

Business Information Systems Lab

   2-6

COMS 420

Certifications in Hardware, Software, & Networking

   2-6

*COMS 205, or COMS 236, or COMS 339 are required in the business core.  Students in this option are required to take all three courses.

 

Option:

Business Administration                                                                                                    30

Course Number

Course Name

Credits

ECON  251

Macroeconomics

3

BUS  241

and

BUS  242

Business Law I

 

Business Law II

 

 

  3*

BUS  329

or

BUS  465

Human Resource Management

 

Labor-Management Relations

 

 

3

BUS  353

and

BUS  341

Quantitative Management Analysis

 

Business Finance

 

 

  3*

BUS  461

Small Business Management & Strategic Planning

 

3

COMS  236

and

COMS  339

Advanced Microcomputer Applications

 

Advanced Database Management

 

 

  3*

 

Select four from the following five

HTR  204

Leadership

3

BUS  202

Customer Service

3

BUS  425

Teamwork & Organizational Change

3

ECON  357

Money & Banking

3

BUS  377

Investments

3

 

*Students are required to take either Business Law I or Business Law II in the business core; students in this option are required to take both courses.  Students are required to take either COMS 236 or COMS 339 in the business core; students in this option are required to take both courses.  Students are required to take either BUS 353 or BUS 341 in the business core; students in this option are required to take both courses.

 

Option:

Tourism                                                                                                                             30

Course Number

Course Name

Credits

BUS  202

Customer Service

3

ECON  334

Economics of Tourism and Recreation

3

HTR  112

Fundamentals of Tourism

3

HTR  204

Leadership

3

HTR  211

Destination Geography

3

Select three of the following four

 

HTR  222

Group Travel

3

HTR  355

Meeting Planning

3

HTR  345

Special Events

3

 

HTR  350

Resort Management

3

Any HTR/ECON/COMS/BUS Rubric (upper division)

6

 

Professional Degree Requirement (all options)

                                                                                                                                          12

BUS  210/410

Career Planning Seminar

2

 

Coop Ed/Internship

10-12

 

 

TOTAL

120

 

            New courses this program will add to the curriculum:

            COMS 236, Advanced Microcomputer Applications – 3 credits

Course Description:  In this hands-on course, students will further develop their competence using word processing and electronic spreadsheet features and functions, including macros, merges, desktop publishing features, large document creation and editing, financial and trigonometric functions, data tables, and charts/graphs.  Students will also explore computer accounting and integration of computer applications.  At the conclusion of the course, students will have covered the expert competencies for the MOUS exams in Excel and Word.  Students will be evaluated by hands-onassignments, special projects, and a final portfolio. 

Prereq:  COMS 135 and MATH110 or concurrent enrollment

 

            (Note:  This course replaces Coms 232, Advanced Word Processing (2 credits) and Coms 238, Advanced Spreadsheets—3 credits).

 

            COMS 420, Certifications in Hardware, Software, and Networking—V 2-6 credits

Course Description:  Students will work closely with their instructor to identify and review nationally-recognized hardware, software, and networking exams.  Software exams must be at the expert level; hardware and networking exams may be at the core level.  Students must pass one exam for each credit taken, and are responsible for all exam fees.

 

HTR 350, Resort Management—3 credits

Course Description:  This course will acquaint students with modern resort operations. Planning, development, operation and management practices will be addressed. Student performance will be measured through written projects and assignments as well as written examinations.

 

BUS 425, Teamwork and Organizational Change—3 credits

Course Description:  The course will provide an in-depth understanding of team formation, team development, team leadership, and strategic organizational change.  Focus of the course will be on the process of organizational development as a foundation for teamwork covering diagnosis, analysis, design interventions, management and evaluation of change.  A variety of strategic team leadership and people-oriented change intervention strategies are covered with special reference to recent trends.  The course covers applications in teamwork, and team-building in local, national, and global companies.  The learning environment encourages students to develop their skills from focused active, facilitated discussion, and hands-on field projects in team-building and managing organizational change.

 

Note:  Several courses in the proposed B.S. degree have different course names than are listed in the 2000-01 catalog.  The new course names for the proposed degree and the 2001-2002 catalog are consistent with current nomenclature and are as follows:  Financial Accounting [formerly Accounting I], Managerial Accounting [Accounting II], Management and Organization Behavior [Principles of Management], Marketing Principles and e-Commerce [Principlesof Marketing], Business Finance [Financial Management], Leadership [Principles of Leadership], and Business Ethics [Social Responsibility]).

 

Effect on Enrollment Over a 10-year Period

A life cycle growth curve was used to forecast graduating seniors in business over a 10-year period.  The growth curve provides a conservative growth model and is similar to a product life cycle.  In the early part of the cycle, growth is modest.  The growth cycle then experiences rapid rates of growth, and then experiences modest growth in the latter part of the cycle.

 

The growth curve for the B.S. degree was approximated by three separate straight-line trend lines: Years 1993-97, Years 1998-2000, and Years 2001-04.  The trend line for Years 2001-04 includes actual numbers of students currently enrolled in the Business and Communications Option.   The Years 2005-10 are simply a linear extension of the 2001-04 trend.  Coefficients (slopes) of these trend lines are 2.5 for the first period of modest growth, 13.5 from the second period of rapid growth, and 2.0 for the third period and fourth projected period.

 

First Period--1993-97--Low Growth Start—(actual numbers)

              Number of

Year t   Graduating Seniors (Tt)     tTt                     tt2         

     1                    4                                  4                      1       

     2                 10                                 20                       4        b1 = 2.5

     3                   4                                12                       9

     4                 11                                 44                     16         b0 = 1.5

     5                 16                                 80                     25

========================================

    15                 45                                160                   55                    

 

Second Period--1998-2000--High Growth Period—(actual numbers)

              Number of

Year t   Graduating Seniors (Tt)     tTt                                          tt2

     1                 15                                 15                     1          b1 = 13.5

     2                 31                                 62                     4

     3                 42                                 126                   9          b0 = 2.3

========================================

       6                   88                                 203                   14

Third Period--2001-2004--Level Off Period—(derived from undergraduate numbers)

              Number of

Year t   Graduating Seniors (Tt)     tTt                                            tt2

     1                 26                                 26                      1        b1 =2.0

     2                 25                                 50                      4       

     3                 30                                 90                      9        b0 = 2.3

     4                 31                                 124                   16

=========================================

 

Fourth Period--2005-2010--Extension of Third Period Model—(forecasted numbers)

              Number of

Year t   Graduating Seniors (Tt)     tTt                                          tt2

1                                   33                                   33                     1       

2                                   35                                   70                     4        b1 = 2.0

3                  37                                111                     9

4                 39                                 156                   16         b0 = 3.1

5                 41                                 205                   25

6                 43                                 258                   36

 

The number of lower and upper division students would be calculated from the above tables.  For example:

            Year 2002:        25 + 30 = 55 upperclassmen

                                    31 + 33 = 64 underclassmen

            Year 2003:        30 + 31 = 61 upperclassmen

                                    33 + 35 = 68 underclassmen

            Year 2004:        31 + 33 = 64 upperclassmen

                                    35 + 37 = 72 underclassmen

            Year 2005:        33 + 35 = 68 upperclassmen

                                    37 + 39 = 76 underclassmen

 

Again, the growth numbers are conservative using the above model.  We believe numbers could increase at a much higher rate using improved structure and  nomenclature for the degree.

 

FACULTY AND STAFF REQUIREMENTS

 

1.  Please indicate, by name and rank, current faculty who will be involved with the program proposed herein.

 

Bill O’Connor, Ph.D., Professor of Business

Jim Sethi, Ph.D., Professor of Business

Cecil Jones, JD, Assoc. Professor of Business

Cheri Jimeno, Ph.D., Asst. Professor of Business

Mark Rogstad, ABD, Asst. Professor of Industrial Technology

Glenda Elser, M.S., Asst. Professor of Business

John Bailey, M. R. E., Asst. Professor of Tourism and Recreation

Iola Else, M.S., Instructor of Education

Shauna Basile, B. S., CPA, Instructor of Business

 

2. Please project the need for new faculty over the first five-year program. Include special qualifications or training. If present faculty are to conduct the new program, please explain how they will be relieved from present duties.

 

One tenure-track faculty position is currently open in Business Education.  However, this is not a new faculty position, and classes usually taught by this faculty member are currently being taught by adjunct faculty.  This position was advertised during Spring Semester 2000, but the applicant pool yielded no new hires.  The position will be re-advertised in November 2000.  Qualifications for this position will include a minimum of a masters degree (doctorate preferred) with expert software certification(s).  Salary will be dependent upon qualifications; salary is determined by the Collective Bargaining Agreement.

 

As the program continues to grow and meets projected enrollment increases (see Effect on Enrollment over 10-year Period), one new faculty member would need to be hired beginning AY 2003 as additional sections in the business core would need to be added. 

 

3.  Please explain the need and cost for support personnel or other required personnel expenditures.

 

There will be no additional need for support personnel because of this program change.  There are no staff or other personnel devoted to servicing this degree.  Current staff time devoted to this degree will be proportional to the numbers of students enrolled in the degree.

 

CAPITAL OUTLAY, OPERATING EXPENDITURES, AND PHYSICAL FACILITIES

 

1.  Please summarize operating expenditure needs

 

The operating expenditures of the B.S. will continue to be the same as with the B.A. option.  Most of the expenses of the program are associated with the teaching of individual courses.  Since the same courses are also used in Western's B.S. majors and minors and the A.A.S. in Tourism and Recreation, costs would be proportional to the numbers of students enrolled in a particular program.

 

2.  Please evaluate library resources. Are they adequate for operation of the proposed program? If not, how will the library need to be strengthened during the next three years?

 

Since the library resources have already been developed to support the existing degree programs, they are adequate to support the new degree. 

 

3.  Please indicate special clinical, laboratory, and/or computer equipment that will be needed. List those pieces of equipment or computer hardware presently available in the department.

 

There will be no specialized computer equipment required for this degree.  Western already has the general office equipment, computers, software and facilities to serve the needs of this degree.

 

4.  Please describe facilities and space required for the proposed program. Are current facilities adequate for the program? If not, how does the institution propose to provide new facilities?

 

Western's Office Simulation Center will be used heavily for this program.  This Center contains computers, software and other equipment commonly used in the business world.  Some of the courses will also be taught using space and facilities of Western's new Rural Education Technology Center

           

EVALUATION OF PROPOSED PROGRAM

 

1.  Please name faculty committees or councils that have reviewed and approved the program herein proposed.

 

This proposal has been reviewed and approved by Western's Programs in Arts and Sciences Committee; Curriculum Committee; and Faculty Senate.  It has also been been reviewed by the academic officers of The University of Montana.

 

2.  If outside consultants have been employed, please list the names of these consultants, their current positions and titles.  Append copies of their written reports (this is a requirement of new doctoral programs).

 

No external consultants were employed in the development of this degree program.