February 27, 2002

 

ITEM 114-104-R0102      Board of Regents Policies and Procedures Manual: Information Technology; Internet Services (4)            (New)

 

No. 4-B

  

SCOPE

 

This policy applies to all MUS students using MUS-owned or managed computing and information resources for student purposes. In this policy "user" refers to student user, as distinct from any role the individual may also have as an employee (Policy 4-A) or patron.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS - INTERNET ACCEPTABLE USE

 

MUS-provided Internet, intranet, and related access services are to be used by students for activities identified as appropriate on the student’s campus.  MUS-provided Internet, intranet, and related access services may not be used for “for-profit” activities (private commercial purposes), except those covered under formal agreements with the MUS, or for providing unauthorized “internet sharing” services to off-campus users (e.g., dissemination of music, video, or other types of information). Students must also follow all other applicable MUS policies when using MUS-provided Internet services, e.g., the MUS information technology policy on “User Responsibilities” (Policy 2-B) and other related policies.

 

Note that use of MUS-provided Internet access and services may be monitored for purposes of planning and managing network resources, performance, or troubleshooting purposes, or for investigation of suspected abuse, as described in the MUS information technology policy concerning privacy and monitoring (Policy 1).

 

COPYRIGHT LAWS

 

MUS computing and information resource users are subject to all applicable copyright laws regarding software or intellectual property, whether private or commercial.  Users may download legally-provided copyrighted material via the Internet, but must adhere strictly to software license agreements, copyright notices, or other agreements governing the use of that material, as may be posted by the provider of the downloaded material.  Duplicating, transmitting, or using software or other electronically formatted intellectual property, except as explicitly permitted by software license agreements or copyright notices, may constitute copyright infringement.